DIY: Oil Change (Gen. 3 & Gen 4.)

Kevan

Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 11, 2006
Posts
2,556
Reaction score
1
Location
New Albany, OH
PREFACE:
Many of my DIY articles are transposed from the dozens that I did for my 2005 Dodge Ram SRT-10. In regards to the engine and transmission, they are pretty much identical to what's found in the Gen.3 cars.
If you see something amiss or incorrect, please contact me and I will make sure this post gets updated.

Remember: All of these DIY articles come with a "PERFORM AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!" disclaimer.
I've idiot-proofed them as best I can but.....

Enjoy!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

OIL CHANGE PROCEDURE FOR 2004-2006 DODGE RAM SRT-10
(Also applies to Viper coupe and convertible).



This DIY article will cover how to properly and correctly change the oil in your Viper-powered vehicle, more specifically the Ram SRT-10.


This is a VERY EASY procedure, and can save you a ton of cash. A normal dealer oil change is well over $150 (I think the record is $300!). You can do it yourself for about $60.


Tools required:
You must be registered for see images attach



- 9/16" socket (though a 14mm also fits, but is very tight).
- 3" extension
- FT-LBS. torque wrench
- Oil filter wrench
- Funnel
- Rubber gloves
NOT PICTURED: Oil catch pan. You'll need one that will hold at least 9-11 quarts.


Materials required:
- 9 qts. of Mobil 1 oil for 2004-2005 trucks (10 qts. for 2006 trucks)
- Oil Filter.


The oil viscosity is marked on your oil cap. Some are "5-30W" some are "0-40W".
Stick with whatever viscosity your oil cap states.


Since this isn't a Hyundai, and many quarts are required, it's best to buy the oil in bulk. I've found that Wal-Mart carries the 5 qt. jugs. They're approx. $25-27. ea. (you'll need 2, heh heh).

MAKE SURE you get the correct oil filter for the Viper engines. You want P/N 5037836AA.
It has a slightly higher flow rating, and has (5) larger holes as opposed to the (8) holes on the regular Mopar filter.
The Gen.4 engines get the filter that's labeled "SRT".


Let's get under the truck and drain some old oil!


Locate the oil drain bolt under the engine. You'll find it toward the back of the engine block:
You must be registered for see images attach



Slide your catch pan under the bolt, and slightly toward the back of the truck. The oil isn't going to drip out; it's going to shoot out, so you want to make sure you have that distance covered.


Loosen the drain plug bolt:
You must be registered for see images attach

(sorry about sneaking a regular socket wrench in there...heh heh)


As you unscrew the bolt, oil will begin to drip....and when the bolt is fully removed, the oil will spew out:
You must be registered for see images attach

(See? I wasn't kidding!)


Inspect the drain plug for swarf (metal chips). There's a magnet on the end of the drain plug that collects swarf and other metallic nasties between oil changes:
You must be registered for see images attach


We don't like metal chips, so we clean off the tip of the drain plug:
You must be registered for see images attach

That's much better.
Also check the sealing washer on the drain plug. If the rubber is torn or damaged at all, replace the sealing washer.


In order to help facilitate the oil flowing out, I remove the fill cap on the valve cover:
You must be registered for see images attach

This lets air in from the top of the engine, so the oil doesn't have to 'gulp' down at the drain plug hole.
You can also remove your dipstick to help with air flow.


We can now take a break and go watch some hockey while the oil drains out. Check on the flow between periods.


When the oil is reduced to one drip a minute, you're drained.
Clean up the drain plug hole area with a paper towel/rag and hand-thread the plug back into place.


Tighten the plug to 25 FT-LBS:
You must be registered for see images attach



Just when you though we were done under the truck.....


You must be registered for see images attach

The filter is going to be a mess to remove. Just plan on oil going all over your hand and arm.
(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)


I wrap a paper towel over the sway bar because I know oil's going to drip onto it:
You must be registered for see images attach

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Slide the oil catch tray under the oil filter.
Use the oil filter wrench and get the oil filter loose enough to turn by hand.
Unscrew the oil filter by hand. Try to keep a grip on it (good luck).


Like I said, oil will cover your hand and arm:
You must be registered for see images attach

G-shock FTW! :grin:


It will take a few minutes for the oil filter socket to fully drain.
Take that time to get all your supplies ready.


When the oil filter socket is done dripping, clean up it's surface with a paper towel/rag. You should also clean up any spillage on other components, namely the top of the brake air duct.


TRIPLE CHECK THAT THE O-RING FROM THE OLD FILTER IS NOT STILL ATTACHED!!!
You must be registered for see images attach

I can't stress that point enough....but I will try:
TRIPLE CHECK THAT THE O-RING FROM THE OLD FILTER IS NOT STILL ATTACHED!!!
If it remains on there, and you put the new filter on, your engine will become a gigantic oil sprinkler....with some serious distance and coverage. I speak from experience.


Some folks like to pre-fill their oil filters. I'm one of them:
You must be registered for see images attach

Just go slow, and let it soak up the oil. It may take a few 'fills' before it's soaked.
DO NOT fill it to the brim. I usually only do it about 3/4 full (in the center). This leaves a little room for the oil filter post to thread on.
(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Use some new oil and lightly coat the O-ring on the new filter:
You must be registered for see images attach

This ensures a nice seal to the engine block.
(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Keeping the filter level, install it onto the oil filter socket on the engine block:
You must be registered for see images attach

Tighten it by hand ONLY!!!
DO NOT use an oil filter wrench to tighten it.
(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Now we're done under the truck.


In the engine bay, we need to put our funnel in place and get it ready to feed the engine some tasty new oil.
My funnel fits the oil fill hole nicely, and holds the normal quart bottles. Unfortunately, it doesn't stay in place by itself, so....a mini-bungee is used:
You must be registered for see images attach

Works great. :grin:
(FOR VENDORS: Anyone that makes a threaded oil fill funnel for the Viper engines will be a hero)


Insert engine oil.


Keep going until your dipstick reads "5 stars":
You must be registered for see images attach

Let the oil settle for a few minutes, then come back and check the dipstick again.


ONLY FILL UNTIL YOU READ 5 STARS ON THE DIPSTICK!!!
If you overfill, you'll need to drain some oil out and then re-fill to the proper level.


Remove the funnel and replace the oil fill cap (aka the 710 cap):
You must be registered for see images attach



Start the engine and let it run for a few minutes, to fully circulate all that new oil.
Shut it off and let it sit for a few minutes.
Check the oil level with the dipstick.
Add oil if necessary.


That's it.
Your oil is changed and you're good for another 3000 miles!



©2008 Kevan J. Geier
All Rights Reserved
 

viperman4125

Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Posts
304
Reaction score
13
Location
North Port, Fl.
PREFACE:
Many of my DIY articles are transposed from the dozens that I did for my 2005 Dodge Ram SRT-10. In regards to the engine and transmission, they are pretty much identical to what's found in the Gen.3 cars.
If you see something amiss or incorrect, please contact me and I will make sure this post gets updated.

Remember: All of these DIY articles come with a "PERFORM AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!" disclaimer.
I've idiot-proofed them as best I can but.....

Enjoy!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


OIL CHANGE PROCEDURE FOR 2004-2006 DODGE RAM SRT-10
(Also applies to Viper coupe and convertible).



This DIY article will cover how to properly and correctly change the oil in your Viper-powered vehicle, more specifically the Ram SRT-10.


This is a VERY EASY procedure, and can save you a ton of cash. A normal dealer oil change is well over $150 (I think the record is $300!). You can do it yourself for about $60.


Tools required:
You must be registered for see images attach



- 9/16" socket (though a 14mm also fits, but is very tight).
- 3" extension
- FT-LBS. torque wrench
- Oil filter wrench
- Funnel
- Rubber gloves
NOT PICTURED: Oil catch pan. You'll need one that will hold at least 9-11 quarts.


Materials required:
- 9 qts. of Mobil 1 oil for 2004-2005 trucks (10 qts. for 2006 trucks)
- Oil Filter.


The oil viscosity is marked on your oil cap. Some are "5-30W" some are "0-40W".
Stick with whatever viscosity your oil cap states.


Since this isn't a Hyundai, and many quarts are required, it's best to buy the oil in bulk. I've found that Wal-Mart carries the 5 qt. jugs. They're approx. $25-27. ea. (you'll need 2, heh heh).

MAKE SURE you get the correct oil filter for the Viper engines. You want P/N 5037836AA.

It has a slightly higher flow rating, and has (5) larger holes as opposed to the (8) holes on the regular Mopar filter.
The Gen.4 engines get the filter that's labeled "SRT".


Let's get under the truck and drain some old oil!


Locate the oil drain bolt under the engine. You'll find it toward the back of the engine block:
You must be registered for see images attach



Slide your catch pan under the bolt, and slightly toward the back of the truck. The oil isn't going to drip out; it's going to shoot out, so you want to make sure you have that distance covered.


Loosen the drain plug bolt:
You must be registered for see images attach

(sorry about sneaking a regular socket wrench in there...heh heh)


As you unscrew the bolt, oil will begin to drip....and when the bolt is fully removed, the oil will spew out:
You must be registered for see images attach

(See? I wasn't kidding!)


Inspect the drain plug for swarf (metal chips). There's a magnet on the end of the drain plug that collects swarf and other metallic nasties between oil changes:
You must be registered for see images attach


We don't like metal chips, so we clean off the tip of the drain plug:
You must be registered for see images attach

That's much better.
Also check the sealing washer on the drain plug. If the rubber is torn or damaged at all, replace the sealing washer.


In order to help facilitate the oil flowing out, I remove the fill cap on the valve cover:
You must be registered for see images attach

This lets air in from the top of the engine, so the oil doesn't have to 'gulp' down at the drain plug hole.
You can also remove your dipstick to help with air flow.


We can now take a break and go watch some hockey while the oil drains out. Check on the flow between periods.


When the oil is reduced to one drip a minute, you're drained.
Clean up the drain plug hole area with a paper towel/rag and hand-thread the plug back into place.


Tighten the plug to 25 FT-LBS:
You must be registered for see images attach



Just when you though we were done under the truck.....


You must be registered for see images attach

The filter is going to be a mess to remove. Just plan on oil going all over your hand and arm.

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)


I wrap a paper towel over the sway bar because I know oil's going to drip onto it:
You must be registered for see images attach

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Slide the oil catch tray under the oil filter.
Use the oil filter wrench and get the oil filter loose enough to turn by hand.
Unscrew the oil filter by hand. Try to keep a grip on it (good luck).


Like I said, oil will cover your hand and arm:
You must be registered for see images attach

G-shock FTW! :grin:


It will take a few minutes for the oil filter socket to fully drain.
Take that time to get all your supplies ready.


When the oil filter socket is done dripping, clean up it's surface with a paper towel/rag. You should also clean up any spillage on other components, namely the top of the brake air duct.


TRIPLE CHECK THAT THE O-RING FROM THE OLD FILTER IS NOT STILL ATTACHED!!!
You must be registered for see images attach

I can't stress that point enough....but I will try:
TRIPLE CHECK THAT THE O-RING FROM THE OLD FILTER IS NOT STILL ATTACHED!!!
If it remains on there, and you put the new filter on, your engine will become a gigantic oil sprinkler....with some serious distance and coverage. I speak from experience.


Some folks like to pre-fill their oil filters. I'm one of them:
You must be registered for see images attach

Just go slow, and let it soak up the oil. It may take a few 'fills' before it's soaked.
DO NOT fill it to the brim. I usually only do it about 3/4 full (in the center). This leaves a little room for the oil filter post to thread on.

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Use some new oil and lightly coat the O-ring on the new filter:
You must be registered for see images attach

This ensures a nice seal to the engine block.

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Keeping the filter level, install it onto the oil filter socket on the engine block:
You must be registered for see images attach

Tighten it by hand ONLY!!!
DO NOT use an oil filter wrench to tighten it.

(NOTE: regular Mopar oil filter was used for the photos. Make sure you get the filter that has the label "VIPER" or "SRT" on it.)

Now we're done under the truck.


In the engine bay, we need to put our funnel in place and get it ready to feed the engine some tasty new oil.
My funnel fits the oil fill hole nicely, and holds the normal quart bottles. Unfortunately, it doesn't stay in place by itself, so....a mini-bungee is used:
You must be registered for see images attach

Works great. :grin:
(FOR VENDORS: Anyone that makes a threaded oil fill funnel for the Viper engines will be a hero)


Insert engine oil.


Keep going until your dipstick reads "5 stars":
You must be registered for see images attach

Let the oil settle for a few minutes, then come back and check the dipstick again.


ONLY FILL UNTIL YOU READ 5 STARS ON THE DIPSTICK!!!
If you overfill, you'll need to drain some oil out and then re-fill to the proper level.


Remove the funnel and replace the oil fill cap (aka the 710 cap):
You must be registered for see images attach



Start the engine and let it run for a few minutes, to fully circulate all that new oil.
Shut it off and let it sit for a few minutes.
Check the oil level with the dipstick.
Add oil if necessary.


That's it.
Your oil is changed and you're good for another 3000 miles!




©2008 Kevan J. Geier
All Rights Reserved
Great job on reporting.
 

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