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DIY - Door Hinge & Hood Mechanism Lubrication

Discussion in 'RT/10 and GTS Discussions' started by dave6666, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. dave6666

    dave6666 Enthusiast

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    Explaining Viper things to you
    I know, you're probably thinking do we really need pics on how to lube the door hinges? And should you really be telling lies about oiling the hood so it won't stay up?

    Well, as many people as there are that seem absolutely stunned when they find out their battery is in the wheel well and the coolant level check is too, then I'd be willing to bet that these items might surprise some people too. So then, we have the out-of-sight out-of-mind door hinges, or in the case of the hood, stuff you may have never realized would help you operate it more easily.

    Door Hinge Lubrication

    It just makes common sense to lubricate a hinge, and your door hinges are no exception. They are expensive when they wear out ($400), and when replacing it you'll be force-fed a class in body alignment techniques. Just a little oil every now and then will add to their life.

    First, pop the hood and you'll see the hinge cover. One per side of course. 5 screws to remove it, with 1 that will require the door to be open to get at it. If the screws are stock, a 5/16" nutdriver will work.

    Important Tip!!!

    ***Keep track of shims that may be behind the covers. You'll need to put those back where they came from. They may stick, they may fall, they may...?***

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    Up close of hidden screw.

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    Shims.

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    Shims stuck to cover.

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    Once the cover is off your hinge should look something like this, and hopefully not covered in shiny little metallic bits that is your self-destructing hinge.

    [​IMG]

    Next step is to clean and lube the mechanism that holds the door open. The arrows point to the flat spring plate on the left, and the aluminum cam on the right that rides on the spring plate. Take a shop rag wetted with some WD40 and clean those surfaces until shiny like in the pic. If you find yours are rough, scratched, or any other undesirable surface finish, you are making progress toward an eventual hinge replacement!

    [​IMG]

    After cleaning these surfaces you need to use a little grease on the cam surface. I like Bosch distributor grease as it is really sticky and hangs around. At minimum use a synthetic grease like green wheel bearing grease. You do not need but a small amount. Too much and you make a sand and dirt magnet out of it.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Next will be to oil the hinge pin itself. Now you can just hose it down with WD40 if you like, but that won't last long. I use a 30wt motor oil in a pump oiler and once again, just small little amounts will do. Put a shop rag under the hinge to catch drips.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Work the door a couple of times to distribute the oil and then all you need to do is put the hinge cover back on. Watch the shim placement if you had any, and don't over-tighten the screws. They can strip and/or crack the plastic cover.

    If you resisted the temptation to buff and wax the hinge cover the marks from the screws should provide easy realignment to the car. You might open the door slowly the first time to double check that you don't have a rub somewhere.

    Hood Mechanism Lubrication

    Important Tip!!!

    ***Do not oil the hood hinges unless you want to carry a stick with you to hold the hood up when open***

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, there are a couple other areas that I've noticed help with opening and closing of the hood.

    First off would be the latches right by the headlights. I've closed my hood before and then later noticed one side has popped up a bit. Although I could probably adjust the stop bumper I decided my first line of defense was to make sure the latch had nothing restricting it from snapping shut. Like being dry from no oil. So give them a little shot of WD40 with a rag held in front to keep from dusting your front fascia with oil.

    These things...

    [​IMG]

    Another area on operating my hood that I noticed needed improvement was getting it to disengage the guides when initially lifting it up. I'm even tall and have a great vantage point, but I was concerned that the wiggle and shake thing was not good.

    So what I did was clean all of the guides and their receptacles once again with a WD40 soaked rag. It may take some work, as mine had some really gooey sticky mucus like crap on them. If after cleaning they look rough or scratched or whatever then you may want to consider replacement and/or aligning your hood properly. One of mine had a very light spot that I groomed with a razor blade a tad to smooth, but they were otherwise OK.

    Lastly what I did was gave the guides (plastic blades) on the hood a thin coat of the Bosch grease. Now when I go to lift the hood up the first bit no more wiggle and shake is needed.

    [​IMG]
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    No need to grease the roller as well, it rolls...

    [​IMG]

    Clean these surfaces good, like down inside the bracket.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ron

    Ron Enthusiast

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    Nice job Dave, thanks
     
  3. 1TONY1

    1TONY1 Enthusiast

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    Ha...I lubed my drivers door about two hours ago....of course I used moly engine assembly lubricant :)

    A note on lubricating the hood hinges. I did that on mine a few years back and it took a year of "un-oiling" to hold the hood back up...just now it is able to hold the hood up again on an unlevel surface or a slight breeze. So folks might want to be cautious and be stingy with the oil. A good plan might be to lightly oil one hinge (each side) at a time and give it a few days before getting another pair.
     
  4. Venomiss

    Venomiss Guest

    Awesome write up for the Illustrated section! Thank you!
     
  5. Tom F&L GoR

    Tom F&L GoR Enthusiast

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    pssst. Dave, use auto transmission fluid on the hinges. It's thinner to penetrate more, has additives to last longer (ATF is essentially fill for life) and has some friction modifiers. Presto!
     
  6. jasontiff

    jasontiff Viper Owner

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    I'd heard a few school's of thought on oiling the hood hinges and listened to the wrong camp; do NOT just squirt some WD-40 on there. I haven't been able keep my hood open for over a year without some assistance.
     
  7. sdaddy

    sdaddy Enthusiast

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    Great post!
     
  8. mike & juli

    mike & juli Enthusiast

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    AWESOME DIY, Dave~!!!! AND, the tips from Tom/Fluids Expert; and 1tony1 too! Okay, I got it now on being stingy with the OIL~! THANX all! As always, Dave, you explain things so even I can understand what you're doing...great write-up/illustrations/use of arrows! TY! ~jules
     
  9. TopGear

    TopGear Enthusiast

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    Viper Magazine, Winter 2008 Edition, Page 40, gives a list of a bunch of lubrication points and what to lubricate with. Door Hinges says to use engine oil.
     
  10. Tom F&L GoR

    Tom F&L GoR Enthusiast

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    Who wrote that? I challenge them to a lube-off!
     
  11. mike & juli

    mike & juli Enthusiast

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    OH gosh, this is gonna be 'low-jacked'...:lmao::lmao::lmao:[​IMG] :smirk: ~juli
     
  12. TopGear

    TopGear Enthusiast

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    Here is the Article. Bottom right table. Last item on table. :eater:


    [​IMG]
     
  13. 1TONY1

    1TONY1 Enthusiast

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    How do you feel about my Moly assembly lube choice ? :D The longevity would be my only thought.
     
  14. 00SVTdubs

    00SVTdubs Enthusiast

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    kind of relevant but which adjustments do you use for the common headlight gap on the drivers side?
     
  15. tophermecier

    tophermecier Enthusiast

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    +1 on ATF for hinge lube. Another tip, a thin weight synthetic hydraulic fluid (which is not unlike ATF). I use it for high end roller chains in industrial automation which have very precise and tight tolerances, due to its high penetration capability. We've seen amp draw drop on electric motors in testing, as a direct result of using hydraulic oil vs motor oil or some sort of moly lube.
     

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