1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Spin Control School

Discussion in 'General Viper Discussion' started by NI-KA, May 14, 2012.

  1. NI-KA

    NI-KA Enthusiast

    Posts:
    723
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Location:
    Canton, Ohio
    Referencing another thread and specifically the post in it regarding YAW.

    http://forums.viperclub.org/threads/653453-Where-in-the-heck-does-this-ridiculous-idea-that-a-Viper-cannot-handle-come-from

    In my limited time observing Vipers at the track I have seen Vipers spin more than I have seen other cars spin. What does that mean? That they are poor handling? Does it mean that they are more difficult to control? Is it the cars fault?

    Last year at NASA Nationals I witnessed first hand of what I speak. I was in the turn one spectator stands. The leading car was a Viper. Rain was threatening and when it came it was very spotty and very brief during this race. It would only rain on a very limited section of the track. After a few laps it hit turn one just before the lead car (viper) came thru. The Viper started to slip then it regained its composure for a moment then it snapped and spun to the inside/right of the track 180 degrees and stopped. Other cars came around boggled a little put passed by. Granted the others may have gotten a yellow flag and some warning, however I did see some pretty good "stumbles" and then full recoveries. Yes the other vipers came thru and did not spin. Experience? A warning by spotters? A little luck?

    It is this tendency to snap that makes the viper so notorious. In my opinion. If you think you are going to recover, ha it fools you and then snap spins. I have seen videos of some of this sites more experience drivers have the same results on track. No one appears immune and it clearly occurs on dry, as well as, wet tracks.

    What I do not understand is why there is no school or instruction that specifically concentrates on this particular aspect. While there may be a fine line between control and out of control I find it hard to believe that there is no way that with repeatable consistent drills/practice that this could not be considerably reduced.

    I would think that if a student spent a day or so with inducing snap spin at low speeds in a wet skid pad type excercise, while attempting to regain control much less of the snap spinning would lead to failure to regain control.

    If I could find a place to practice this safely and legally myself, I would.

    So tell me why this isn't possible?

    Or tell me which instructors out there are most adept at producing the skills needed in order to deal with this? Is this just going to be way to expensive?

    If there are any instructors out there that see this please PM me...
     
  2. viper067

    viper067 Enthusiast

    Posts:
    666
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Location:
    Downingtown, PA
    In your example many things could have happened, the Viper had slicks on .. The light rain raised the oils on the track making it more slippery and the other drivers took note of what happened in front of the, etc.

    Generally with the Viper you are dealing with tremendous amounts of grip and torque. The problem is if you lose grip it is very easy to over correct due to the massive torque and there isn't much time to think...something like a Miata provides a much greater ability to recover simply due to its limited power.

    You can practice it all you want, but very few can actually recover once you pass your initial grip limit.

    Just my 2c as a learning driver ... You probably need some answers from drivers who spin more than I
     
  3. Leslie

    Leslie Enthusiast

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    4,525
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Location:
    Indiana
    Hey Sam

    I went through an advanced instructor training a few years ago that had us run through several 'spin' scenarios. I really enjoyed it, felt we should be doing that for the students too!

    We did a skid pad at Summit Pt. Also, but not in our own cars, would love to do it in my Viper....or even take a drifting class:)
     
  4. FrgMstr

    FrgMstr Guest

    I have been looking for a Drifting School to attend but have yet to find one with any luck. Guess I just need to go find a big parking lot with no cameras.
     
  5. viper067

    viper067 Enthusiast

    Posts:
    666
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Location:
    Downingtown, PA
    Autocross is probably the best car control you can do safely. For some extra points, try it in the rain. If you don't have the car going sideways then, you're not trying. And I should mention its a blast.

    Are you willing to travel to a drifting school or are you looking local? You could ask a local performance driving center if they offer what you are looking for, or try your local Porsche dealer ... They usually know all the driving schools.
     
  6. NI-KA

    NI-KA Enthusiast

    Posts:
    723
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Location:
    Canton, Ohio
    I would love to find a parking lot that could be used without alot of red tape or cost.

    I can imagine that there may not be a big market for this since everyone is focused on going faster and dealing with spin control isn't necessarily directed at that.
     
  7. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy Enthusiast

    Posts:
    1,357
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2002
    Location:
    upstate, NY
    Easy answer. When the car gets out of control the normal brain reaction is to lift off the throttle. Weight transfers more to the front wheels which are now pointed in the direction of the slide. Hence you exit the track from the oversteer. Toughest thing to learn is give it more throttle to plant the weight more on the rear tires and drive thru it.. The gas pedal is your friend.
     
  8. JLorello

    JLorello Viper Owner

    Posts:
    177
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
  9. cash84

    cash84 Viper Owner

    Posts:
    393
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Location:
    Germantown, WI
    I believe this 100%!! I saved my a$$ quite a few times by using the throttle.

    Easy answer. When the car gets out of control the normal brain reaction is to lift off the throttle. Weight transfers more to the front wheels which are now pointed in the direction of the slide. Hence you exit the track from the oversteer. Toughest thing to learn is give it more throttle to plant the weight more on the rear tires and drive thru it.. The gas pedal is your friend.
     
  10. NI-KA

    NI-KA Enthusiast

    Posts:
    723
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Location:
    Canton, Ohio
    practice, practice, practice.
     

Share This Page