1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Noise from the rear end in SRT 10

Discussion in 'SRT10 and SRT10 Coupe Discussions' started by Sennahnamrecken, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. Sennahnamrecken

    Sennahnamrecken Enthusiast

    Posts:
    17
    Joined:
    May 9, 2020
    Location:
    3400 N. Ocean Dr. West Palm Beach FL 33404
    I have a noise coming from the rear end of my 2008 SRT 10 when I take slow, sharp turns.
    Any idea what could that be? Differential?
     
  2. BYAIC

    BYAIC Enthusiast

    Posts:
    81
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013

    Did you have the differential fluid changed recently? Does it sound like the dif is grinding metal? If so then they did not add the (required) tiny bottle of Friction Modifier. Get them to change it again but add the Modifier this time.

    If it was fine and this appeared out of nowhere, without a recent dif fluid change, then it could be a number of things.
     
  3. Dan Cragin

    Dan Cragin Enthusiast

    Posts:
    1,230
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2007
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Could be it needs to be service and friction modifier added. That typically fixes that issue.
     
  4. Francis Simmons

    Francis Simmons Enthusiast

    Posts:
    4
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2020
    Location:
    Moncks Corner, SC
    Had the same issue with my 2004 recently. Found out I was supposed to change differential fluid and additive every 24,000 miles- mine had 27,000. After dealer changed fluid and additive, grinding noise disappeared.
     
  5. Sennahnamrecken

    Sennahnamrecken Enthusiast

    Posts:
    17
    Joined:
    May 9, 2020
    Location:
    3400 N. Ocean Dr. West Palm Beach FL 33404
    Thank you gentlemen, my mechanic came up with the same solution, although he is not a Viper mechanic. He has experience with race cars. Remains only my problem with a "claque" noise engaging and disengaging the clutch. We wonder if this is typical for the SRT 10?
     
  6. MoparMap

    MoparMap VCA National President Venom Member

    Posts:
    1,746
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas
    Rear end "clunk" is pretty typical with these cars but has never really been indicative of an issue. It acts like driveline lash or something, but doesn't seem to cause any issues.
     
  7. Sennahnamrecken

    Sennahnamrecken Enthusiast

    Posts:
    17
    Joined:
    May 9, 2020
    Location:
    3400 N. Ocean Dr. West Palm Beach FL 33404
    Thanks, the rear end "clunk" was a major concern of mine. A good friend of mine just told me, that his Viper of the late 90ies had the same "clunk" in the rear end. I owned most all sportscars produced here and in Europe, am still learning about the antics of the Viper, which is fun, and I love the car to death.
     
    2L8ULUZ likes this.
  8. littlecaars

    littlecaars VCA Venom Member Venom Member

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    35
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    Mohnton, pa.
    As has been stated, the clunk is more than likely to be the backlash adjustment. I am on my fourth Viper and I can say with reasonable certainty that Chrysler is a little bit sloppy on that adjustment at the factory. Nothing to worry about but the only way to take care of it is to take the differential out and adjusted properly.
     
  9. Sennahnamrecken

    Sennahnamrecken Enthusiast

    Posts:
    17
    Joined:
    May 9, 2020
    Location:
    3400 N. Ocean Dr. West Palm Beach FL 33404
    Thank you gentlemen, you all have been very helpful, and here is more. We have added the noise abating additive to the differential today and discovered, that in neutral on the lift the two rear axles can be moved left and right between the differential and the wheels. They have a play of some 3/4" to 1". We believe that the clunk is coming from that? Is that what "littlecaars" is writing about? How worried do I have to be about that? What is the worst case scenario. Thank you for helping me out
     
  10. BYAIC

    BYAIC Enthusiast

    Posts:
    81
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    If you are using a mechanic for this but you are here looking for advice to share with him, you need a new mechanic. Unfortunately I have no idea about an answer to your question, I’ve never put mine up on a rack and wiggled the wheels, it may be completely normal. Others here will likely know.

    After you added the Modifier did you take it for a test drive? Is the noise still occurring?

    But I’m confused. First you said the noise occurred in slow sharp turns, highly likely Friction Modifier. Then it was the noise occurred when the clutch was released. Which is it?

    ETA: I think I understand what you are trying to say. When you release the clutch while making a slow sharp turn, say after backing out of a parking spot and turning tight to go, that’s when you experience the clunking sound. But if you engage the clutch while slowly moving forward in a tight turn the sound goes away, is that correct? Do yourself a favor and just change the differential fluid using MOPAR spec fluid and add the MOPAR Friction Modifier, start there.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2021
  11. MoparMap

    MoparMap VCA National President Venom Member

    Posts:
    1,746
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas
    I'm pretty sure that play should be normal. Most have shafts are built to have some side to side play in them for various reasons. The most likely one is think about how your suspension moves up and down. It doesn't move in a perfect arc and even if it did, the output shaft on the diff isn't the center point of that arc. The half shaft has to be able to rotate in that same arc, but will likely have to change length to be able to do that, so there is some side to side movement available in them.
     
  12. Sennahnamrecken

    Sennahnamrecken Enthusiast

    Posts:
    17
    Joined:
    May 9, 2020
    Location:
    3400 N. Ocean Dr. West Palm Beach FL 33404
    Thank you Gentlemen for your advice. Here my comment to BYIC. I have a good mechanic who services mostly European Sports Cars, Ferrari, Aston Martin, Porsches and Mercedes and more. He was well aware of the reason for some play of the half shafts, but from his European cars, he was not used to such large tolerances. Eventually he said, "it's a Dodge after all."
    The friction modifier did its job well, and I have no more noises after changing the differential fluid along with it.
    The clutch problem was just an error of mine and really was the the clunk of the half shafts that comes about when shifting.
    Bottom line MoparMap hit the nail on the head in every respect and explains my unwarranted worries very well.
     
  13. BYAIC

    BYAIC Enthusiast

    Posts:
    81
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    This is classic and related to the Friction Modifier in most cases. As mentioned it was either not added at a fluid change or it just degraded over time and use. Congratulations on getting it sorted out!

    Race cars? Anyway, my car has no such clunk when I engage or disengage the clutch for shifts, it is very smooth, as expected. You may have a separate issue there; motor mounts or joints are a possibility.


    I get the sarcasm from a mechanic that works on European cars, no problem. That’s why I will only take my Viper to a mechanic trained to work on Vipers. And conversely I won’t take my classic Porsche to my Viper Specialist. The Viper is a Dodge in the same way a GT 40 and an AC Cobra are Fords.
     
  14. Mike Dolan

    Mike Dolan Viper Owner

    Age:
    71
    Posts:
    109
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Location:
    Northern California
    I had that a couple years ago - intermittent grinding noise when turning - sounded ominous. Turns out it was just worn parking brake pads. Sure sounds like something grinding in the differential but it's not. Simple fix.
     
  15. MoparMap

    MoparMap VCA National President Venom Member

    Posts:
    1,746
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas
    Ah, that's a really good point as well. I had the same thing happen on mine. You get just a little bit of rotor flex when turning and it's enough to hit the pads different.
     

Share This Page