Broken fan - What Now

GTS Dean

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Some people hear that only a New Assembly will work, then say 'oh' with a sad face.

I hear that and say 'scr ew that, I'll find something that'll fit and work for 30% the price, max.' It's just a fan, and every ICE car has to have a fan of some sort to cool.
 
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Rubble

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Gentlemen. I have been schooled ! Too think all I was looking for was a way to fix my broken fan. Did not even know what a hydraulic fan was till I had this problem. Great info contained here thanks to all. I am sure others will benefit from the info exchanged on this thread as well.
Now back to the problem at hand here. VS you say the blades are replaceable. Ok I could see that and believe I saw it done on a you tube video. However, according to the dodge dealer and several on line sites the blade assembly (as it is not individual blade’s) is not available separately. Only as part of cooling fan assembly Make sense ?
So…how does one get their hands on Just the blade assembly ? Wrecker ? Aftermarket ?
 

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Gentlemen. I have been schooled ! Too think all I was looking for was a way to fix my broken fan. Did not even know what a hydraulic fan was till I had this problem. Great info contained here thanks to all. I am sure others will benefit from the info exchanged on this thread as well.
Now back to the problem at hand here. VS you say the blades are replaceable. Ok I could see that and believe I saw it done on a you tube video. However, according to the dodge dealer and several on line sites the blade assembly (as it is not individual blade’s) is not available separately. Only as part of cooling fan assembly Make sense ?
So…how does one get their hands on Just the blade assembly ? Wrecker ? Aftermarket ?
You need to buy another unit, and steal the blade assembly from it. There are usually motor or shroud damaged systems floating around Ebay or Salvage with good blades.
 

99RT10GTS

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Upgrade to a dual electrical setup like Dodge did for the Gen 4s............. Did for a reason......
 

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Upgrade to a dual electrical setup like Dodge did for the Gen 4s............. Did for a reason......
You mean Downgrade.

Ask all those Ram SRT-10 guys how those electric conversions worked out for them. :rolleyes:
 
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Rubble

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….and just when I thought it was settled ha ha
Hey Vs. Well here is my challenge. I’m in Canada what do we have 10% of the vipers Produced ? The access to the fan would be limited to say the Least. My option: find in the Us. Pay with our Peso then shipping and duty. Most guys know what their worth. Then remove assembly then the fan only and replace then re install assembly. I believe we may be approaching the $1100 + 3hrs labour investment to buy new whole assembly. Which dodge indicates is on BO. But 2-4 wks away (we’ll see)
 

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….and just when I thought it was settled ha ha
Hey Vs. Well here is my challenge. I’m in Canada what do we have 10% of the vipers Produced ? The access to the fan would be limited to say the Least. My option: find in the Us. Pay with our Peso then shipping and duty. Most guys know what their worth. Then remove assembly then the fan only and replace then re install assembly. I believe we may be approaching the $1100 + 3hrs labour investment to buy new whole assembly. Which dodge indicates is on BO. But 2-4 wks away (we’ll see)
What you aren't factoring in, is that the same blade is used on all versions of the hydraulic fan, whether in a Viper or not.

The other versions, are generally much cheaper, and all over the place. I wouldn't doubt if you could find one in your local wrecking yards.
 

MoparMap

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I think it was mentioned here already, but you'd want to be on the lookout for Jeeps and Mercedes of similar vintage (early-mid 2000s). Not sure what models specifically, but good to know it was the same fan on all of them.
 

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I think it was mentioned here already, but you'd want to be on the lookout for Jeeps and Mercedes of similar vintage (early-mid 2000s). Not sure what models specifically, but good to know it was the same fan on all of them.
Blades ONLY. Shrouds of course differ, and motor configurations and valving also appear to differ between versions.
 

GTS Dean

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4 things to check for alternate sourcing:
Outer Diameter of fan
Depth of the outer fan blade support cylinder
Number of Blades and orientation
Shaft Diameter at the drive hub
 
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MoparMap

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Blades ONLY. Shrouds of course differ, and motor configurations and valving also appear to differ between versions.
Even better to know, thanks! Will file that away for future reference should the need ever arise.
 
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Rubble

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Ok that makes sense that they are all a
Common fan blade between viper and GC. I did see the schematic for grande Cherokee assembly and the fan did look identical. Awsum my potential parts pool has grown !
 

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I'm bringing this thread back after being asleep for a couple of months.

My 2006 coupe has ruptured three sets of power steering lines, from the pump to the fan.

The three sets of lines came from two different manufacturers.

The P/S pump was replaced after the second line failure. So the most recent line failure was with a new pump.

Could the pressure relief valve inside the hydraulic fan motor be stuck closed, causing pressure to build up in that line and ultimately rupture?

I read through the wealth of information on this thread, and I'm planning on converting to an electric cooling fan.

I have two questions.

1. Does the PS oil cooler return line flow enough to sufficiently return all fluid back the reservoir?

2. If another Oil return line is necessary, how would I go about doing that?

Thanks Gents.
 

MoparMap

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The return lines shouldn't be under pressure, so that's a bit odd to start with. I'm surprised it would rupture the line and not just blow it off the pipe bead at the clamp, unless we're talking different hoses. There should be 5 total hoses in the system if I remember correctly:

1. High pressure hose from pump to fan (quick connect fitting at pump, screw on bump tube style fitting at fan)
2. Return line from fan to pump (large diameter plain rubber hose, constant tensions hose clamps on either end)
3. Line from fan to power steering rack (high pressure, bump tube fittings on either side)
4. Line from power steering rack to cooler (should be low pressure, but don't recall fittings on this one, I think bump tube at rack and maybe something like quick connect on cooler)
5. Line from cooler back to pump (small diameter, lower pressure, I think quick connect on cooler and simple hose clamp on pump side)

Is it line number 2 that you are bursting?

There is a pressure relief valve on the pump itself (controls pressure to the fan), and a second one in the fan that controls relief for the rack. The thing to keep in mind is they are relief valves, not necessarily control valves. So if they are stuck shut they don't necessarily cause the system to always operate at high pressure. Pressure is only formed when you have restriction to start with (like running the rack to the stops), and I'm not sure how you'd get pressure buildup in the fan unless it wasn't turning.

It might be worth picking up a steering analyzer and doing some checking first before you change anything. That will help isolate which component is actually the problem. I kept thinking my pumps were junk and put a half dozen in my car before I finally found out the problem was my fan module had a stuck open relief valve that was bypass my rack. It could be you have a problem in your steering rack that is causing extra pressure that is getting dumped through the relief valve in the fan module, so even if you replaced the fan with electric you might still blow lines if the problem is in the steering system. Try to find the actual faulty component first before replacing everything around it if you can.
 

GTS Dean

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In addition to the pump flow control valve, the G3 fan has a thermostatically controlled valve. The dual hydraulic circuits are more complex in operation and have a different demand curve for pressure and flow.

Does your steering seem to function correctly and the problems are mostly with the fan circuit? If you've got any fragments of previous hoses floating around in the system they could definitely be causing flow problems and burst hoses.

The Gen 1-2 systems flow at between 1.5-2GPM and the idling pressure is pretty low - around 70-80psi. The relief valve bypasses at 12-1300psi.

PS pressure/flow testing setup:
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Fatman2006

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The return lines shouldn't be under pressure, so that's a bit odd to start with
Perhaps I used the wrong terminology. But that would beg the question, how does the fluid get back to the reservoir if not under pressure?

@MoparMap you are correct, the lines are separating at the connection not a mid line ruptures, sorry for the confusion. They are aftermarket AN fitting lines.

Referencing your numbers, it's line 1 that is failing.

@GTS Dean

Will PS pressure/flow testing help diagnose an issue with the rack as well.

I've eliminated the possibility that it's the lines, and the power steering pump. So it has to be the fan or hopefully, not the rack.

The steering system functions normally, until that line burst then it functions not at all .

The last time the line burst, I just put the car back together, refilled the reservoir. The line burst with no input on the steering wheel at all.
 
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MoparMap

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I mean, there would be some pressure in return lines, but it should be significantly less than what would be on the feed side. Return lines go to the back of the reservoir and are held on with simple spring clamps, so I would guess that they would only have a couple psi in them, not the 100+ you can see on the pressure side of things.

As for your line 1 breaking, that's the main feed line for the whole system, so there is definitely something going on. Almost sounds like the system is deadheading somewhere to blow an AN line off, almost like it can't even get to the relief valve in the fan to start with. I would be more suspicious of the fan module based on that. Does the fan turn freely at all?

It is a bit odd though. If the system was deadheading it should be opening the relief valve in the pump and cycling fluid there, effectively shutting off the whole system. Based on my limited knowledge of hydraulic design, those lines and fittings should be rated for probably at least twice what the system pressure should be as a safety factor. I'd think they would be failing at the crimp where the hoses are attached, which should still theoretically be rated for system pressure. The good news about having the AN style lines is that you can buy just about any steering analyzer and make it work. The only reason the "official" Miller branded Dodge one is so expensive is because of the fittings it comes with. Otherwise there are basically just two out there, a standard and a heavy duty. Only real difference between them is the flow and pressure range they measure. I bought one for a Saturn for $50 and had no problems using it on my car since I only needed AN hose to connect it. It you don't want to pick one up I'd consider trying to find a shop around you with one that you trust. It wouldn't take long to hook one up on the main feed line to see if you are seeing excessive pressure with nothing going on in the system. They also let you test the relief valve in the pump pretty quickly to make sure it's operating as intended.
 

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Perhaps I used the wrong terminology. But that would beg the question, how does the fluid get back to the reservoir if not under pressure?

@MoparMap you are correct, the lines are separating at the connection not a mid line ruptures, sorry for the confusion. They are aftermarket AN fitting lines.

Referencing your numbers, it's line 1 that is failing.

@GTS Dean

Will PS pressure/flow testing help diagnose an issue with the rack as well.

I've eliminated the possibility that it's the lines, and the power steering pump. So it has to be the fan or hopefully, not the rack.

The steering system functions normally, until that line burst then it functions not at all .

The last time the line burst, I just put the car back together, refilled the reservoir. The line burst with no input on the steering wheel at all.
For what its worth... there is a reason I shun aftermarket PS lines and pumps.

Write down the EXACT chain of events and component changes, and the source of those components each time.
 

GTS Dean

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Referencing your numbers, it's line 1 that is failing.

@GTS Dean

Will PS pressure/flow testing help diagnose an issue with the rack as well.

I've eliminated the possibility that it's the lines, and the power steering pump. So it has to be the fan or hopefully, not the rack.

The steering system functions normally, until that line burst then it functions not at all .

After re-reading the flow path from Post #44, and your comment about having installed a new pump, I would think you are likely to have a flow restriction issue at the fan module.

It would appear the first duty of this system is to keep the engine from overheating. The second is to provide steering boost. If the primary pressure line from the pump to the fan module is blowing, the fan is my pick as the primary culprit. It's blowing the line before the engine gets overheated.

The steering pressure/flow tester is designed to test the operational limits of the system and determine whether problems originate from the pump, or the rack. There is probably a test procedure in the shop manual for the two systems in the Gen 3. The rack is only serviced by Dodge as an assembly. https://turnonesteering.com/ can provide adapter fittings and rebuild services. They can work on all Viper gens.
 
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Viper Specialty

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After re-reading the flow path from Post #44, and your comment about having installed a new pump, I would think you are likely to have a flow restriction issue at the fan module.

It would appear the first duty of this system is to keep the engine from overheating. The second is to provide steering boost. If the primary pressure line from the pump to the fan module is blowing, the fan is my pick as the primary culprit. It's blowing the line before the engine gets overheated.

The steering pressure/flow tester is designed to test the operational limits of the system and determine whether problems originate from the pump, or the rack. There is probably a test procedure in the shop manual for the two systems in the Gen 3. The rack is only serviced by Dodge as an assembly. https://turnonesteering.com/ can provide adapter fittings and rebuild services. They can work on all Viper gens.
while I dont disagree, I keep coming back around to the obvious: There is no way the PS line should be able to rupture even with a capped end, that is the purpose of the PRV in the pump.

So... defective line designs? bad pump PRV? plugged fan/bad PRV/poor hose quality...? I am betting there is more than one issue here.
 

Fatman2006

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while I dont disagree, I keep coming back around to the obvious: There is no way the PS line should be able to rupture even with a capped end, that is the purpose of the PRV in the pump.

So... defective line designs? bad pump PRV? plugged fan/bad PRV/poor hose quality...? I am betting there is more than one issue here.
I would agree, however. Lines have come from 2 different manufacturers and separated in the same fashion. The power steering pump was also replaced and the line failure still happened.

That leaves fan or rack. The steering assistance has always been there no matter what speed, up until failure. That leads me to believe the steering system is fine.

My current plan to diagnose the issue, run a power steering line straight from the pump to the rack. Take the cooling fan out of the equation by completely disconnecting everything. Use the return from the P/S oil cooler as the primary return. Go through the procedure of bleeding air out of the system and see what happens.

Speaking of the air bleeding process. Does anyone have a tried and true method that works for them?
 

MoparMap

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I'm not sure if bypassing the fan is a good idea or not. I guess the pump isn't all that different from any other pump, but think about the circuit for a second. In stock form, the pump outputs enough pressure and flow to run two different systems. The fan uses more volume of fluid and has a large return line than the steering. If you take it out of the system you're now asking the one smaller return line to handle all of the flow of the system. It might be okay, but I'd be a bit hesitant.

Even without a full steering analyzer (which is really just a flow and pressure gauge in one unit), you could always just put a simple pressure gauge inline with an AN tee fitting and see what it's reading. You could even move the gauge between the fan and steering rack if you have the aftermarket lines throughout as you wouldn't need special fittings. The problem really seems more like a pump or line issue as the pressure in the system should never be high enough to fail a hose if correctly designed, or the hoses were just poorly constructed and you got unlucky twice in a row. The failsafes in the system aren't failing safe is what I keep coming back to. It's almost more like the pressure relief valve in the pump is stuck open, but you'd also have to have a restriction somewhere to build the pressure.

Really dumb question, but when you put the new pump in, I assume you left the plunger inside that goes under where the big feed line fitting screws in? I know when I first saw that when I was replacing stuff that it seemed weird that there was something blocking the flow path, but after looking at the parts closer I started to understand how it worked. If you took that out you wouldn't have any pressure protection at the pump anymore, which could be a reason for excessive pressure in the system.
 

Fatman2006

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I'm not sure if bypassing the fan is a good idea or not. I guess the pump isn't all that different from any other pump, but think about the circuit for a second. In stock form, the pump outputs enough pressure and flow to run two different systems. The fan uses more volume of fluid and has a large return line than the steering. If you take it out of the system you're now asking the one smaller return line to handle all of the flow of the system. It might be okay, but I'd be a bit hesitant.

Even without a full steering analyzer (which is really just a flow and pressure gauge in one unit), you could always just put a simple pressure gauge inline with an AN tee fitting and see what it's reading. You could even move the gauge between the fan and steering rack if you have the aftermarket lines throughout as you wouldn't need special fittings. The problem really seems more like a pump or line issue as the pressure in the system should never be high enough to fail a hose if correctly designed, or the hoses were just poorly constructed and you got unlucky twice in a row. The failsafes in the system aren't failing safe is what I keep coming back to. It's almost more like the pressure relief valve in the pump is stuck open, but you'd also have to have a restriction somewhere to build the pressure.

Really dumb question, but when you put the new pump in, I assume you left the plunger inside that goes under where the big feed line fitting screws in? I know when I first saw that when I was replacing stuff that it seemed weird that there was something blocking the flow path, but after looking at the parts closer I started to understand how it worked. If you took that out you wouldn't have any pressure protection at the pump anymore, which could be a reason for excessive pressure in the system.
That's a good point about bypassing the fan. The reasons I think it will work:
1. The same steering rack is used in Gen 4 Vipers with electric fans. The rack functions off a set flow rate and psi, there is no pressure drop in the system because of the fan. The output psi and flow from the steering rack to the reservoir should not increase because the fan is removed. Gen 4 steering wouldn't work if the rack expects a certain psi and is under or over delivered.

2. Pulling from your first reply to me, the return line is not under that much pressure. The single return line should be enough to handle that pressure and flow rate. There shouldn't be an increase in either one of those after removing the fan. The large return line from the fan will not be required because that amount of fluid is no longer moving through the system. It should just be the fluid that is demanded by the power steering rack, which the single return line is designed for.

3. Others have done the same conversion, by placing a Y into the return line from the P/S oil cooler, back to the reservoir.

I can't get a steering system analyzer or gauge onto the system, the line blew almost immediately this last time. It can't be a line issue or the power steering pump, I've gone through three sets of lines, and a new power steering pump so I do not believe those to be the problem. And yes, I left the plunger in place because I understood it was a pressure regulating fitting. The fan functions as a byproduct of the power steering system, so the steering system should work with the fan removed. Something I didn't think about that you brought up, the amount of fluid needed will definitely be less.

If any of those assumptions are incorrect, please let me know, because that's all they are is assumptions I am definitely no hydraulic engineer lol.

Thanks Gents.
 

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I would agree, however. Lines have come from 2 different manufacturers and separated in the same fashion. The power steering pump was also replaced and the line failure still happened.

That leaves fan or rack. The steering assistance has always been there no matter what speed, up until failure. That leads me to believe the steering system is fine.

My current plan to diagnose the issue, run a power steering line straight from the pump to the rack. Take the cooling fan out of the equation by completely disconnecting everything. Use the return from the P/S oil cooler as the primary return. Go through the procedure of bleeding air out of the system and see what happens.

Speaking of the air bleeding process. Does anyone have a tried and true method that works for them?
1. That's because, by design, they are not up to the task. A real crimped hydraulic line and a stainless braided teflon are not created equal. The PRV in the pump should have prevented that possibility in both instances, and you also haven't excluded that the line fittings and PRV in the pump are not part of the problem. Secondly, you didn't do what I requested earlier and listed the exact chain of events and source of parts so that I can figure out where the fault is in your diagnosis tree... because you definitely have one and are now guessing with multiple variables.

2. The SRT-10 pump is designed to run a fan and rack. to run a rack only is overkill. For testing OK, but I wouldn't be leaving it like that ideally.

3. Where is your factory power steering line and original pump?

4. The system is self bleeding.

5. Going to electric is a mistake in general, but it's your car. If you are hell-bent on it, we can reconfigure your ECU to control an electric fan.
 
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Fatman2006

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1. That's because, by design, they are not up to the task. A real crimped hydraulic line and a stainless braided teflon are not created equal. The PRV in the pump should have prevented that possibility in both instances, and you also haven't excluded that the line fittings and PRV in the pump are not part of the problem. Secondly, you didn't do what I requested earlier and listed the exact chain of events and source of parts so that I can figure out where the fault is in your diagnosis tree... because you definitely have one and are now guessing with multiple variables.

2. The SRT-10 pump is designed to run a fan and rack. to run a rack only is overkill. For testing OK, but I wouldn't be leaving it like that ideally.

3. Where is your factory power steering line and original pump?

4. The system is self bleeding.

5. Going to electric is a mistake in general, but it's your car. If you are hell-bent on it, we can reconfigure your ECU to control an electric fan.
Sorry missed the timeline.

Factory lines began leaking.

Replaced with braided stainless lines from Viper Parts USA, pump to fan line separates while pulling into drive way.

Replaced both lines with The Viper Store lines, left previous fittings in place. Drove for about a week, same line separates while driving.

Replaced with new lines and fittings from The Viper Store, replaced P/S pump. Line separates while bleeding the system. Specifically, I did one round of filling the system and getting air out. Turned the car off to check for leaks and fluid level. Everything looked good, started the car and the same line separated with wheels straight and no input on the steering wheel.

I wouldn't say I'm hell-bent on going electric, but if the fan is the issue I don't want to replace it with another hydraulic fan. If electric fans move the CFM and get the job done, I don't see the benefit of staying with a hydraulic fan.

The factory pump is in my garage, the lines are in the trash.

Thank you for giving me feedback.
 
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Viper Specialty

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Sorry missed the timeline.

Factory lines began leaking.

Replaced with braided stainless lines from Viper Parts USA, pump to fan line separates while pulling into drive way.

Replaced both lines with The Viper Store lines, left previous fittings in place. Drove for about a week, same line separates while driving.

Replaced with new lines and fittings from The Viper Store, replaced P/S pump. Line separates while bleeding the system. Specifically, I did one round of filling the system and getting air out. Turned the car off to check for leaks and fluid level. Everything looked good, started the car and the same line separated with wheels straight and no input on the steering wheel.

I wouldn't say I'm hell-bent on going electric, but if the fan is the issue I don't want to replace it with another hydraulic fan. If electric fans move the CFM and get the job done, I don't see the benefit of staying with a hydraulic fan.

The factory pump is in my garage, the lines are in the trash.

Thank you for giving me feedback.
You did what so many do, unfortunately. You replaced a small problem with huge problems, and paid a bunch of money to do so. Those aftermarket PS lines are known for failure, and the replacement fittings are known to cause PS PRV issues. Your original pump is surely fine, and your original lines were a simple fitting replacement away from being fine for another 10-15 years. Your fan may be the issue NOW, but I would be willing to bet that is because of something in one of those lines that was installed, and now is blocking the internal ports.

Sure, an electric fan can keep it cool... but not as well. It has far less overhead, and will have numerous new alternate failure points.

The short of it, is that you need to stop changing parts, put it back the way it should be, and have the fan motor inspected and/or replaced based on what is going on.

Unfortunately you are about as far away as you could possibly be and still live in the USA, or I would say just send me the car and you'll get it back right.

Nobody properly deals with these systems, and everyone is quick to sell people things they don't need, ultimately at their expense. Case in point... these "kits" include the line between the Fan and Rack. I have NEVER, EVER seen an OEM line fail right there for any reason. Why in the world are people paying to create new problems in that line?
 
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Fatman2006

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You did what so many do, unfortunately. You replaced a small problem with huge problems, and paid a bunch of money to do so. Those aftermarket PS lines are known for failure, and the replacement fittings are known to cause PS PRV issues. Your original pump is surely fine, and your original lines were a simple fitting replacement away from being fine for another 10-15 years. Your fan may be the issue NOW, but I would be willing to bet that is because of something in one of those lines that was installed, and now is blocking the internal ports.

Sure, an electric fan can keep it cool... but not as well. It has far less overhead, and will have numerous new alternate failure points.

The short of it, is that you need to stop changing parts, put it back the way it should be, and have the fan motor inspected and/or replaced based on what is going on.

Unfortunately you are about as far away as you could possibly be and still live in the USA, or I would say just send me the car and you'll get it back right.

Nobody properly deals with these systems, and everyone is quick to sell people things they don't need, ultimately at their expense. Case in point... these "kits" include the line between the Fan and Rack. I have NEVER, EVER seen an OEM line fail right there for any reason. Why in the world are people paying to create new problems in that line?
Well, I wish I knew that before I embarked on this little endeavor.
 

Fatman2006

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OK quick update. I removed the fan and did the refill and bleed process. The system worked perfectly, unlike last time when the fan was installed. The last time, as I turned the wheel there was a substantial amount of resistance at the steering wheel. This time smooth sailing, filled the reservoir, and did some turns on the wheel with all good response. No ruptured high-pressure lines.

I can definitely say the fan was the issue for one unknown reason or another (perhaps self-induced, as some pointed out). However, CFM is CFM, as long as the electric fan keeps the car at temperature I see no issue.

I'm going to convert to electric. I'll make a new thread for the conversion. Hopefully, you gents will continue to give me feedback and guide me on this journey. Thanks for all the assistance up to this point.

Some light reading about the pump.

chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://www.eaton.com/ecm/groups/public/@pub/@eaton/@hyd/documents/content/pll_2373.pdfS
 
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Viper Specialty

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OK quick update. I removed the fan and did the refill and bleed process. The system worked perfectly, unlike last time when the fan was installed. The last time, as I turned the wheel there was a substantial amount of resistance at the steering wheel. This time smooth sailing, filled the reservoir, and did some turns on the wheel with all good response. No ruptured high-pressure lines.

I can definitely say the fan was the issue for one unknown reason or another (perhaps self-induced, as some pointed out). However, CFM is CFM, as long as the electric fan keeps the car at temperature I see no issue.

I'm going to convert to electric. I'll make a new thread for the conversion. Hopefully, you gents will continue to give me feedback and guide me on this journey. Thanks for all the assistance up to this point.

Some light reading about the pump.

chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://www.eaton.com/ecm/groups/public/@pub/@eaton/@hyd/documents/content/pll_2373.pdfS
CFM is not CFM when comparing a 10 horsepower fan to a pair of 1/8 horsepower.

That said, if you are going to do it, the easiest method is the Gen4/5 fan shroud assembly. When you need to control it, let me know and we can reconfigure the PCM for relay control instead of hydraulic.

I still think you are making mountains out of mole hills. If you want the system fixed, just contact me.
 

MoparMap

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Why not just replace the current fan module? It seems like you're going to spend more time and money trying to retrofit a new system than to just replace the old one since it seems like you found the problem. Then it's just a straight drop in and maybe a couple hundred bucks if that and you're done. It's not like these things are failing left and right. If not the same exact fan module, they used the same general design in Jeeps and Mercedes of the time in the hundreds of thousands of vehicles of volume. I think you only see anyone talk about it here because it's an unfamiliar system to a lot of people, so when anyone has a problem they ask about it and that's kind of what this forum is all about.
 

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