DIY: AN Fittings & Braided Lines (Applies to all generations)

Kevan

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PREFACE:
Many of my DIY articles are transposed from the dozens that I did for my 2005 Dodge Ram SRT-10. In regards to the engine and transmission, they are pretty much identical to what's found in the Gen.3 cars.
If you see something amiss or incorrect, please contact me and I will make sure this post gets updated.

Remember: All of these DIY articles come with a "PERFORM AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!" disclaimer.
I've idiot-proofed them as best I can but.....

Enjoy!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Anyone that considers themselves a car nut has seen these types of fittings. They're on everything from the Space Shuttle to high-end show cars to the fastest dragsters and race vehicles in the world. It's what they use to quickly connect and disconnect medium to high pressure lines for fluid or air transfer.


For us engine nuts, it's the ultimate way to get fuel and other fluids from one place to another. The AN fittings are fairly universal, and come in a variety of sizes and colors. It's a great way to not only upgrade the performance of your engine, but also it's looks.


Most of the time you'll see red/blue connectors like this one:
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There are other colors available, like all-black:
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...and chrome, and unfinished, and black/gold, etc. Pick a color, and you can find it on someone's ride. :)
AN connectors are usually available with the following turns:
- Straight
- 45º
- 90º
- 120º
- 180º


Sometimes you'll find hoses that are pre-assembled, like this:
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The length is set and connections have been built for you.


This DIY article is for those that want to build their own.


We'll start out with some basic specs on AN fittings and hoses, courtesy of Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN_thread
It's a great reference. Bookmark it.


Most of the time we're trying to match up the inside diameter (I.D.) of our hoses, but AN works off the outside (O.D.) of the line involved.
It's something to think about when you're re-hosing your vehicle. A little thought goes a LONG way.


Popular sources for AN fittings are:
- JEGS (www.jegs.com)
- Summit Racing (www.summitracing.com)


For this project, I'm working with -10 ("dash ten") AN fittings and matching nylon braided hose:
You must be registered for see images attach

I opted for the black/red fittings as they more closely match the theme in the engine bay of the truck. A few bucks extra for the bling. I had to do it. LOL
How non-cheap? Well, that's about $120 right there.
No. I'm not kidding.


The lines I'm running are for the oil cooler for the Viper engine. It took me a while, but I finally figured out the proper size fittings for both the engine in and out, as well as the oil cooler in and out (7/8-14....or -10AN). Once you have your in and out fittings for the piece(s) you're working on, you can start in on your lines.
For this project I'm using nylon braided lines.
Why not stainless steel? Because of the the heat.
Viper engine bays get VERY hot, and stainless steel retains heat much longer than aluminum or nylon.


Making the lines is EASY.
So easy, a caveman could do it. :D
Just remember to cut them a little LONG. Trimming is easier than re-doing an entire line.


Trim your line to the desired length, leaving a little extra....just in case.


There are 2 main pieces to the connector:
You must be registered for see images attach

- Main connector (black in the picture)
- Locking nut (red in the picture)


Slide the nut over the hose end:
You must be registered for see images attach

With nylon it's easy to get all the braiding inside the nut (fingernail works great..heh heh).
With stainless steel braid, you'll probably want to use something like the Koul Tools hose building guides (about $180 for the full set, but worth it if you're doing anything more than 4 lines).
When cutting either type of hose, wrap some masking tape around the area you want to cut. This will keep the hose from fraying after the cut is made. Remove the tape before sliding the locking nut onto the hose.


Make sure that you don't push the hose into the nut too far!
You only want to go until the hose reaches the 'bottom' of the threads inside the nut:
You must be registered for see images attach

If you go too far, you risk breaking the nut and or crushing the tube of the main connector.


Apply some lubricant to the tip and threads on the main connector:
You must be registered for see images attach

(sorry...crappy night time pic, but I did spray PTFE on it, I swear!)
The **** will help the tip and threads of the main connector slide inside the tubing.


For about half of the threads, you can just hold the nut, and use a combination wrench to thread on the main connector. After that, you'll need something stronger to hold it.
I used my little vise with the rubber grips. It worked fine, but I may invest in the plastic vise mounts. Again, the more lines you build, the more the investment in tools will pay off.


Here's the completed connector:
You must be registered for see images attach

Only tighten it until you can't see any more threads.
Don't '****' the locking nut up against the main connector nut.
The one thing I did do was line up the "flats" on the locking nut with the "flats" on the main connector nut. Took about 10 extra seconds, but looks a little more pro. :)


That's it.
Now you're ready to build some AN hoses!


Enjoy!


EDIT-
Okay, after further testing (and knuckle-busting), I have come to a conclusion:
GET THE AN-SPECIFIC TOOLS!!!
I scratched up (slightly) a couple of the connectors, and with the price of these things....the right tools are definitely worth it.


- I shopped around and found a GREAT deal on a full set of AN wrenches:
http://www.speedwaymotors.com/p/2932,248_Aluminum-AN-Wrenches.html
$50 for a set of 8.


- For the connectors, I've seen a few different things, but I'm going to try out the 'connector vise' from JEGS:
http://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/80548/10002/-1
$25.
The other one that looked decent was from PermaCool (via JEGS):
http://www.jegs.com/i/Perma-Cool/771/15199/10002/-1
$35.


IMO, the the tools will pay for themselves after their first use.


Here are some torque specs for connecting the fittings once you've built them:
  • SIZE......MAX TORQUE (ft.lbs)
    -03..........8.75
    -04..........11.5
    -06..........16.25
    -08..........29
    -10..........35
    -12..........45
    -16..........70
    -20..........85
The other method, and this is all over the vintage hot rod forums, is:
Finger/hand-tight, then add 1/4 turn.
Not quite as scientific, but....it's working for those guys.


REMEMBER: These are ALUMINUM fittings, so they can be damaged easily if you torque them too far. A little goes a LONG way.


I've seen a few DIY articles online where the person uses thread sealant or teflon tape when assembling fittings to hoses. This not needed as the fittings are using a metal-to-metal seal (not a thread seal).
Just add a drop of oil/**** on the threads during assembly and you're good to go.


All content is ©2008 Kevan J. Geier
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
 

Fatboy 18

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I love these DIY illustrated guides, thank you for taking the time to write and post these Guides up.

Things like this make the VCA Website a great place to be :2tu:
 

cowger

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Yup, ditto on the thanks for posting these here. As has been discussed multiple times on this forum, I do want to emphasize that many folks have had trouble with the fittings from jegs.com, including me. I eventually got them to stop leaking but I would not go this route again.

Bryan
 

MoparMap

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I used the Push-Lok style stuff on my 67 Dart fuel lines when I converted my 5.7 Hemi back over to fuel injection. They're nice and easy to put together and have worked well so far. Less bling factor since mine don't have a braided cover, but they meet NHRA spec, so I didn't really mind. I believe they're rated up to around 300 psi for some of the hoses and ends, so they should be good for about any system you'd want to use them on (fuel, oil, water, etc.), though size might be a limitation. I don't know just how big they make the push-lok stuff.
 

Red Snake

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Good write up. I have never done AN lines but I would like to. Do they have T fittings for these lines?
 

Steve M

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Good write up. I have never done AN lines but I would like to. Do they have T fittings for these lines?

Lots of options available for fittings, t-fittings included.

One warning I'll throw out that bit me a couple years back...using rubber lined braided hose (Earl's Perform-o-Flex) for fuel delivery was not a good idea. After a few months, the hoses started leeching fumes, to the point of really stinking up my garage even when the car was only sitting for months at a time. Apparently, the additives in todays fuels do not get along with the rubber used in that style of line. For fuel lines, I'd highly recommended teflon lined hose, and the appropriate hose ends (Goodridge is a good place to start...Pegasus Auto Racing sells the line and fittings). Once I swaped all the fuel lines over to that, I never had another issue.

For other fluids, the rubber lined stuff is good...oil, coolant, etc. I'd just steer clear of it for fuel.
 

MoparMap

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Yeah, I've heard that with the fuel as well. So far I've been getting along okay, but then again as old as the car is who knows what kind of smells it puts off that I just don't notice, lol. Some people have had really bad luck with them and have had them swell and leak and others have had no problems at all. Some of it might just be the difference in local gas too.
 

Kevan

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The only problem I ever had with AN fittings and braided lines was the drain it put on my bank account. They work great, they look great, and they're sooooooo easy to do. It's very, very addictive!

Of course, use the appropriate line for the fluid involved.
Check what types of fluid the lines can handle prior to purchasing.
Teflon-lined are the best type, and will cover pretty much any of the low PSI fluids.

Also, these are for low pressure (sub-200 PSI) lines, like the oil cooler, heater hoses, etc.
If you want to do brake or clutch lines (very high PSI), you will need totally different fittings and totally different hose.
For the clutch line in the truck, I used stainless steel braided line and AN fittings from Aeroquip (via Summit Racing).
 
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